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by the sea
writing


The following are three of the discussion threads that I've had to complete for one of my subjects "Texts & Contexts." In each we had to answer a question & submit it online. These are just a few of the ones I've done.

"A good read, Id like to think so!"

I'm certainly not an open book, you might find me hiding in a back corner of a library. Covered in dust and highly unread. But once opened I'd contain many chapters that would be totally random & not make any sense what so ever. Funny & emotional, quiet & shy. You'd probably, at times, be able to skip a chapter here and there. Many boring aspects and a few melodrama's. I certainly don't have the life of a character in "Days of Our Lives," for one I don't talk to myself in a corner after leaving a room.
Perhaps, me, as a text would only sell a few copies. But those copies would be rare, maybe not so precious but I'd like to hope that they were treasured by the owner.
Me, as a text. That's it. Where does it end? I can't say yet, like "The Never Ending Story," but it ended and so will I. But the question is, will it be a "Cinderella" ending and "happily ever after," perhaps, but preferably perhaps not. I'd like to be different but definitely have all the happy stuff in the middle.
My favorite chapter would be when I'm having some beer with my friends. A laugh or ten and having the best time at the backyard BBQ.
But, myself as a text. I'd like to read me for the most part.


"Americanism"

I asked my housemate (who is a German exchange student from Poland) what she saw as an Australian icon. Her two responses were "Koala & Kangaroo" part of which I actually expected it also pleased me a little because she didn't relate us to beer, bbq's or corkscrew hats.
She also went on to mention the ocean, beaches, Uluru and the Great Barrier Reef. I had to smile at that because everything she mentioned to me, is an icon for us. No Vegemite, meat pies, thongs or Russell Crowe. What she mentioned where all natural parts of Australia nothing "man-made" but something which a foreigner can associate with Australia.
Personally when I'm asked to think of something Australian, like many I immediately turn to the stereotypical things such as beer, Vegemite and football. None of which are bad but we all have to realise that there is more to the country than that.
There is also more to us that trying to become a "mini-America" I don't see why we should have to be like them. They're so large and commercialised and all they are concerned about is being the best and not caring whom they step on in the process. They have shootings in schools, crap TV shows and they can't even run a simple presidential election... yet we STILL want to be like them. Please, someone explain to me why and not using money as an excuse. Sure they might be the most powerful country but why can't Greece or France or Egypt or England or Australia have influence. As I see it each of those countries have more to offer than America ever will. They don't have huge old buildings, pyramids, coral reefs or historical culture. They have commercialisation, fast cars and Wall Street. But shouldn't we be thankful, they brought us McDonalds after all!
When you ask someone where they would like to travel to a large majority will say America, but first why can't we travel Australia and see what we have to offer. See the icon's we have here and find our culture and what we have to offer.
Another discussion thread I read brought up "Crocodile Dundee" unfortunately most people associate him with the Australian icon, I personally don't know anyone like him. Another problem with Australian icons is that if you are ever in a chat room with American's and mention you are from Australia there is no doubt that someone will be stupid enough to ask if we ride a Kangaroo, have one as a pet and wrestle crocodiles. Pity, if only they'd come here.
Australia has many beautiful, natural icons if only we could relate to them more often.


"Lost in the Bush"

Bush Vs Beach.
Each have their own pro's and cons, their own myths. But why is it that Australia has to choose between the two? We're either "bush people" or typical "beach bums" why can't we be both. I think that I am.
I spent the first 12 years of my life living in a house within a 5 minute drive to the beach, then the family moved to my father's family farm and we lived there for 8 years and then returned to "town" within a 7 minute drive to the beach. Now I'm living here, in Lilydale without a beach in site (except perhaps the little one at the lake).
I love the beach more than the bush, there's no denying that. I would prefer the beach to the bush any day but as far as myths and culture go one would definitely have to turn to the bush.
The beach is the modern day myth, everyone now has a beach house, or wants one at least. There are less and less people wanting to live right out in the bush, hidden away from society so to speak. With neighbours a 20-minute drive away, working the land to blood, sweat and tears. Facing the bad times and the worse times. There are so many stories to be told from the bush, everything has a past and a history behind it. Whether it's the old "outside dunny" or the little bush hut that's "out the back." Or maybe it's just your grandparents that worked the land from the age of 12.
In actual fact we're the lucky country, we are. Most have the option to go to the beach one-day and the bush the next. How many other people can say that? Myths or not, perhaps our history is the bush but maybe the future is the beach?

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